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Gaspésie riverbank

Gaspésie riverbank

At low tide, the Estuary’s tidal pools reveal myriad treasures.

  • Zebra mussel, an invasive species

    Zebra mussels on a rock

    This small, freshwater mussel, originally native to Europe, is a real threat to certain young fish, other mussels and the River’s aquatic invertebrates.

    The zebra mussel reproduces and spreads quickly. Among other things, it filters an enormous amount of water to feed itself, consuming a great many of the microscopic plants and organisms in it.

    It is said to be an invasive species.

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  • Underwater plants

    Algae at the water’s surface.

    Fucus, kelp, sea lettuce… the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are home to a wide variety of seaweed. They can be seen at low tide in the pools that form between rocks and washed up on shore.

    Seaweed farming is growing. Some seaweed species are used in food and others in medical treatments.

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  • Lobster-coloured

    Blue American lobster in the Exploramer aquarium.

    Due to genetic mutations, some of these crustaceans are born certain colours (blue, black, bright red).

    There are also albino lobsters, which are white due to mutations or dietary deficiencies. And, one lobster in 50 million is born with a two-tone body!

    Despite the different colours, they are just as tasty to eat as any other lobster.

     
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Gaspésie riverbank

At low tide, the Estuary’s tidal pools reveal myriad treasures.

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